Highway Project Unearths Post-Medieval Burial Ground in England

Highway Project Unearths Post-Medieval Burial Ground in England

Twelve months after a massive archaeological dig at the Trinity Burial Ground that forms part of a £355 million Highways England improvement and redevelopment project started in Hull in northern England, the burial ground project is drawing to a close. The rich haul of material excavated from the post-medieval burial ground in Hull provides a fascinating peek into life in the 18th and 19th centuries in the port town. The excavations were carried out by Balfour Beatty, Oxford Archaeology, Humber Field Archaeology, Hull City Council, Historic England, and Hull Minster.

Project Manager Stephen Rowland told Hull Daily Mail that the graveyard was consecrated in 1785 as an emergency measure as space in the Holy Trinity Church burial ground in Hull’s Old Town began running out. This was the result of a population expansion driven by increasing commercial and industrial activity in Georgian and Victorian England. The Trinity Burial Ground was used until 1861 and in that time the parish register recorded 43,000 burials. 

Rowland told the newspaper, "Although it is known that some of those people were interred in the original medieval cemetery located immediately around the church, the majority are thought to lie within Trinity Burial Ground on Castle Street.” Rowland said the team’s work had uncovered a wealth of details about the population of the city as it expanded rapidly in the 18th century.

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Excavations Reveal Pergamon Amphitheater Had Reserved ‘Box Seats’

Aerial view of the Pergamon Acropolis and huge Pergamon Amphitheater, Izmir Province, Turkey.      Source: Tarik GOK / Adobe Stock

Which sports and entertainment fan today hasn’t yearned for box seats or VIP seating for their favorite concert? Despite the needle of time ticking away through these centuries, some things don’t seem to have changed...

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DNA Analysis of Spain’s Segorbe Giant Reveals Ancient Ethnic Cleansing

An artist’s illustration of the Segorbe Giant along with genetic information about his maternal and paternal lines. 	Source: University of Huddersfield

Genetic experts have completed a full sequencing of a DNA sample obtained from a 1,000-year-old skeleton unearthed in 1999 in an ancient Islamic cemetery near the village of Segorbe, Spain.

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Ancient Ancestors Walking All Over Clovis First Academics

This undated photo made available by the National Park Service in September 2021 shows fossilized human footprints at the White Sands National Park in New Mexico. ( National Parks Service )

21st Century man is very conscious of the carbon footprint he leaves behind, but footprints of people who lived about 23,000 years ago have just walked all over modern man’s Clovis First Theory. 

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Mysterious Origins of the Etruscans: DNA Study Solves the Riddle

Bust of an Etruscan woman. Source: Ana Tramont / Adobe Stock

A new study published in the journal Science Advances offers evidence to support the theory of local origins of the Etruscans, an advanced Iron Age peoples in central Italy.

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St Rumwold: The Infant Saint and Medieval Miracle Stories

St Rumwold was an infant saint. Source: Framestock / Adobe Stock

Tucked away in an almost-forgotten manuscript from the 11th century is the extraordinary tale of St Rumwold, an infant saint who lived on this earthly plane for only three days. 

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Ancient Siberians Bred, Bought and Traded Arctic Dogs

Woman with arctic dog. Source: Demian / Adobe Stock

Genetic breeding programs in the ancient Arctic required fresh DNA from faraway places. Therefore, long-distance trade routes rang with the barks and howls of horny Arctic dogs as they marched northwards to play away from home.

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Divers Find Huge 1,500-Year-Old Roman Coin Hoard off The Spanish Coast

Three gold coins on the seabed. Source: Copyright University of Alicante.

Two amateur divers cleaning trash from the seabed of Alicante while holidaying off the coast of Spain have uncovered a cache of 1,500-year-old gold Roman coins. 

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The Phaistos Disc: Spiral Secrets Suggest It’s a Festival Calendar

Phaistos Disc Side A.		Source: C Messier/ CC BY-SA 4.0

In 1908, Italian archaeologist Luigi Pernier was working in southern Crete at an ancient Minoan palace located in the town of Phaistos.

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Full Military Honors: Why Did General Santa Anna Bury His Leg?

Gen. Santa Anna's prosthetic leg remains on display at the Illinois State Military Museum in Springfield. (Lane Christiansen / Chicago Tribune)

Antonio López de Santa Anna was a controversial yet highly influential general who had earned the title of the “Napoleon of the West.” The period in which he lived was also sometimes referred to as the “Age of Santa Anna.” 

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Medieval Gunpowder Recipes Blasted In New Experiment

Medieval gunpowder recipes were far from perfected and led to many explosive accidents. Source: photosampler / Adobe Stock

Researchers have recreated and exploded a series of medieval gunpowder recipes. A new paper shows that through trial and error so-called ‘black powder’ was developed

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Herero and Namaqua Genocide: The Little-Known First Genocide of the Second Reich

German soldiers shooting Herero people in 1904

When you hear the word genocide, your mind may immediately go to the Holocaust by the Nazis during the Second World War. Very few know that the first genocide of the 20th century that almost led to the extinction of two nations of Southwest Africa – Herero and Namaqua – and this one was also done by the Germans. But let’s take things from the beginning.

The Beginning

The German South-West Africa was a colony of the German Empire between 1884 and 1915. It included a land of 835,100 square kilometers (322,433.91 sq. miles), which was one and a half times the size of Germany.

In 1915, during the First World War, British and South African forces entered Germany Southwest Africa to conquer it. After the war, the area was commanded by the Union of South Africa (part of the British Empire) and was named Southwest Africa, after a directive by the Union of Nations. In 1990 it became an independent country and since then it is known today as Namibia.

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Stone Circles Explained: How Maypoles and Lintels Lead to Stone Houses

Castlerigg Stone Circle, Cumbria, England     Source: grahammoore999 / Adobe Stock

The following essay is extracted from “Stone Circles Explained” by Stephen Childs. This book offers some alternative and less explored theories of the purpose of stone circles.

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23,000-Year-Old Human Footprints Found In New Mexico Are Revolutionary

The ancient New Mexico footprints found at White Sands National Park, which could be dated because the footprints were embedded with native plant seeds. 		Source: Bennett et al. / Science

Multiple patches of human footprints found alongside a long-vanished Ice Age lake in New Mexico have finally been dated, many years after they were first discovered.

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Wuxia The Underdog Chinese Martial Arts Hero And The Code Of Jianghu

Wuxia The Underdog Chinese Martial Arts Hero And The Code Of Jianghu

Those who are familiar with the Chinese word wuxiá (martial heroes) may associate it with memories of martial arts films and television programs that portray a fanciful depiction of Chinese martial arts to audiences around the world.

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Gas Pipe Workers Accidentally Unearth Chilca Culture Burial in Peru

One of the Chilca culture burials accidently unearthed by the Calidda gas company in the city of Chilca, 37 miles (60 km) south of Lima Peru.	Source: Calidda

Workers laying pipes for the gas company Calidda in Chilca, which is 37 miles (60 km) south of Lima, Peru, have recently uncovered the remains of eight people buried together in a Chilca culture 

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Marie Antoinette’s Diamond Encrusted Bracelets Will Sell For Millions

Marie-Antoinette     Source: Christie’s / Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin FRCP(Glasg)/ CC BY-SA 4.0

A pair of Queen Marie Antoinette’s bracelets are to come under the hammer next month. With the richest collectors in the world all primed, it’s expected that the already whopping $2 to $4 million estimate will be smashed.

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Are Afghanistan’s Archaeological Treasures Safe?

Bactrian gold crown, an archaeological treasure of Afghanistan

Experts are concerned for the future of Afghanistan’s archaeological sites and treasures following the Taliban takeover. Even if the ancient sites are not looted and destroyed, there is still the worry that the extremist Islamic group may already be hunting for the famous Bactrian treasure - a collection of more than 20,000 gold, silver, and ivory objects recovered from ancient burial mounds in northern Afghanistan.

Ministry States that the Treasure is Safe

The Ministry of Culture and Information has responded to these concerns, stating that the treasure is in an unnamed safe place. Hamdullah Wasiq, the deputy of the Cultural Commission, said, “The Bactrian Treasure is under the government’s control. It is protected. There is no worry and steps are being taken to protect it.”

The Bactrian treasure, also known as the Bactrian gold, was discovered in 1978 in some 2,000-year-old graves at a site called Tillya Tepe. In the past the Bactrian treasure was protected when it was transferred to a bank’s underground vault. But many other artifacts were not so lucky.

Bactrian treasure ram figurine. (Public Domain)

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World’s Oldest Jewelry Excavated at a Moroccan Cave

World’s Oldest Jewelry Excavated at a Moroccan Cave

Human beings have been wearing necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and other forms of jewelry for a long time. But the discovery of a cache of prehistoric Aterian sea snail shell beads at a cave in western Morocco has pushed the origin of this practice back farther than archaeologists and anthropologists ever expected. 

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Necropolis in Turkey Reveals the Iron Age Burial Customs of the Urartu

Recently, the Çavuştepe Castle necropolis dig team discovered a new type of Urartu tomb where the dead were buried near a platform structure. The bones of an adult in this tomb were found in a mixed state with the head of the corpse next to its feet as this image clearly shows. Source: Anadolu Agency

Excavations that started over five years ago at a Urartian necropolis at Çavuştepe Castle in eastern Turkey (ancient Anatolia) have revealed a multiplicity of burial customs among the Iron Age Urartu people 

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Columbus’s Identity Crisis and the Ongoing Spread of False Columbus News

Was the fleet of Santa Maria, Pinta and Niña represented here admiral led by Christopher Columbus or Don Cristóbal Colón?

The news was astounding! Famous India was discovered just a month’s sailing across the Atlantic, proclaimed the first-ever International Press Release, dated Lisbon, March 4, 1493.

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8 Ancient Chinese Inventions the West Had Not Imagined

Great Wall of China, China.

According to the statistics provided by the World Economic Forum, nowadays China can boast its position of the world’s second largest spender on scientific research and development, yielding only to the United States.

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8 Jars Of Colombian Emeralds, Gold, and Silver Unearthed Near Bogotá

8 Jars Of Colombian Emeralds, Gold, and Silver Unearthed Near Bogotá

Archaeologists in Colombia have discovered a vast treasure hoard that’s being related to El Dorado, the legendary city of gold. But these offerings of gold, silver and Colombian emeralds have nothing to do with El Dorado, which was a creation of 16th-century conquistador folklore.

Eight ceramic jars filled with gold, silver and Colombian emeralds have been discovered at an ancient temple site in Colombia near the capital city of Bogotá. While the media are associating the discovery with the 16th-century Spanish legend of the lost city of gold, El Dorado, these are in fact “Muisca” artifacts, not Spanish artifacts. Now that is clear, let’s ask the question on the lips of many of you, who were the Muisca?

The incredibly big and priceless Colombian emeralds found in the 8-jar treasure hoard at the ancient Muisca temple site on the edge of modern-day Bogotá. (Francisco Correa / Live Science)

The incredibly big and priceless Colombian emeralds found in the 8-jar treasure hoard at the ancient Muisca temple site on the edge of modern-day Bogotá. (Francisco Correa / Live Science)

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Researchers Role Play Neanderthals Hunting, In the Name of Science

Neanderthal hunting birds in a cave at night. The latest study, using role play, has shown that Neanderthals were likely also nocturnal hunters, which is a completely new aspect for our ancient cousins.		Source: Gorodenkoff / Adobe Stock

A recent research study published in the online journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution has thrown up exciting new evidence about collaboration on complex tasks amongst our closest ancient human relatives

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The Roots Of Modern Science In Ancient Kemetic Egypt

A doctor performing eye surgery. The Ebers Papyrus discusses medical techniques and remedies. Source: Articles sur l’Egypte et son historie

In the modern Western world, science and religion have changed places in terms of which is regarded as ‘reality’ and what is most likely ‘just a fantasy’.

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Scientists Conclude Cosmic Impact Destroyed Jordanian City

An evidence-based depiction of the cosmic impact which had the power of 1,000 Hiroshimas. Source: Allen West and Jennifer Rice / CC BY-ND 4.0

Approximately 3,600 years ago, there was a catastrophic event in the modern-day Middle East that completely destroyed the city of Tall el-Hammam in present-day Jordan. Up to now, the source of this possible cosmic impact event had been a mystery.

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3: The Perfect Number - Trinity Symbolism in World Religious Traditions

3: The Perfect Number - Trinity Symbolism in World Religious Traditions

The concept of a Trinity or triadic nature of the divine has been a part of our psyche for thousands of years, and has appeared in creation tales, myths, religious writings and holy texts the world over. Yet to this day, the Trinity is always thought of as having its origin in Roman Catholicism—most notably at the Council of Nicaea in AD 325, the first ecumenical council of Christian bishops where the consensus of beliefs was decided upon for all of Christendom, including the Trinity as the three-fold nature of the persona of God.

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Ice Age Scotland Recreated In “Incredible” New Film

Representation of how the ice would have covered the landscape of Dundee as it would have been during last Ice Age in Scotland.       Source: YouTube Screenshot

A new 3D visualization is revealing what the Scottish city of Dundee looked like during the Ice Age of 20,000 years ago. At this time, the location of the east coast city was packed flat beneath a 0.6-mile-thick ice sheet.

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Who Were the Jutes? The Mysterious Tribe Who Settled In Britain

The Jutes were part of the major colonization of the British Isles in the 5th century. Source: Nejron Photo / Adobe Stock.

The history of the British Isles is a colorful patchwork, made up of the diverse tribes and nations that sought to make the island their home. Peoples migrated to the island through the Bronze Age, all the way to the arriving Celtic culture and on to the Vikings and other Nordic settlers.

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Nature’s Medicine Cabinet: Ancient Medicines, Remedies and Tinctures That Worked

A surgeon letting blood from a woman's arm, and a physician by a Flemish painter (18th century) (Wellcome Images / CC BY-SA 4.0)

When those unfortunate moments occur in life that require medical assistance, one should be thankful to be alive today and not even as far back as the last decade.

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